The Finer Points of Creative Weltschmerz-ing

It’s time – past time really – to discuss the finer points of creative weltschmerz-ing. As in scrap-booking, there are some distinct rules and provisions which will make the experience that much more fulfilling and righteous.

The definition of weltschmerz as given by wiki is excellent! Delving into weltschmerz as a new student, there is much to learn!

a term coined by the German author Jean Paul and denotes the kind of feeling experienced by someone who understands that physical reality can never satisfy the demands of the mind. This kind of pessimistic world view was widespread among several romantic authors such as Lord Byron, Giacomo Leopardi, François-René de Chateaubriand, Alfred de Musset, Nikolaus Lenau, Herman Hesse, and Heinrich Heine. It is also used to denote the feeling of sadness when thinking about the evils of the world—compare empathy, theodicy.

The modern meaning of Weltschmerz in the German language is the psychological pain caused by sadness that can occur when realizing that someone’s own weaknesses are caused by the inappropriateness and cruelty of the world and (physical and social) circumstances. Weltschmerz in this meaning can cause depression, resignation and escapism, and can become a mental problem (compare to Hikikomori). The modern meaning should also be compared with the concept of anomie, or a kind of alienation, that Émile Durkheim wrote about in his sociological treatise Suicide.

It can be a challenge to find a postcard which fulfills all the things weltschmerz promises. We know that a feeling is an emotion which is caused by a number of factors – the chemicals in your brain, the food you ate today, how good a hair day you are having, genetic predisposition, cultural attenuations . . . but when one is scrapbooking weltschmerzing or seeking the ways of weltschmerz there are five * other rules I would insist need to be attended to.

1) Find the highest level of acceptable vulgarity possible. The level of vulgarity should be of a bourgeois sort (see ‘bourgeois’) teetering on the very knife-point of utter tastelessness. (Note: ‘tastelessness’ does not preclude things of a presupposed higher cultural order or financial output – see ‘Unhappy Hipsters’ for examples within this metier.)

2. Aim for cute-ness. This is a core value. Do not neglect the cute-ness.

3. The tonality of the finished piece should ooze cold, not warm – but the external surface must make pretense at warmth.

4. The final concept must scream ‘trite’. Within this trite-ness there should be a looming self-assurance.

If you can meet these four rules your creative weltschmerz-ing project should be accepted and embraced by multitudes! I leave you with the above postcard as fair example of the genre.

Best of luck to all who decide to pursue this field, and – of course -
Have a Nice Day!!!! ♥

* There are only four other rules. The fifth rule ran away.

7 thoughts on “The Finer Points of Creative Weltschmerz-ing

  1. Pingback: To Weltschmerz or not, oh … why not? | Caillette (Saputo), Maskinonge Restaurant, Dairy, Laiterie « A Canadian Family

    • Well – you have to feel it in your bones. It is possible that some people are weltschmerz-intolerant. But if you do find something weltschmerz-ish, let us know!!!!! :)

  2. Great card, Mary! To me it has too much joy in it to be weltschmerz. Weltschmerz has sort of a sense that enters within one where you want to sort of die from the sheer horror of what you are seeing because it is so terribly, deeply, dreary. Ha ha ha! But there are so many opportunities to find weltschmerz in life that most of the time it is best when it can be avoided. :)

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